Australian Charter For The Arts

Actions of the former Arts Minister have highlighted the need for the Australian arts sector to articulate and advocate for our common ideals.

Initially growing out of a small group of arts practitioners and arts workers in Sydney, the draft Charter has been constructed and co-authored by artists, arts workers and arts lovers from across Australia. We are currently a small team of volunteers and welcome active involvement from anyone concerned about the Australian arts sector and arts policy development.

Our primary aim is that everyone involved in the Australian arts sector is represented by the principles of this Charter and that it is not owned by any one group or set of interests.

The Charter is as an advocacy tool. It is a public object, available to anyone engaging with arts policy development, be they artists, politicians or community leaders. It will be published online and collect the names of individuals, ensembles, groups and organisations that support the principles. In this way, its key functions are a) to unite the sector through the articulation of common ideals and b) influence and engage arts policy development on local, state and federal levels.

We have been working on this draft since May – incorporating feedback from peers and making changes relative to the shifting political situation. However, we recognise that the document needs to be circulated more broadly so that it represents all the voices and needs of the national sector.

We welcome your input on the main principles and their sub-points. Please note that there are a few sub-points that require specific attention from those with specialised experience. This includes, but is not limited to, experience in indigenous, aged, disability and community arts.

Are your concerns and interests represented in this document?

Is your community represented by this document?

Are there elements that could be interpreted as divisive?

Would you sign your name to the Charter, showing support for these principles? If not what changes would be required for you to consider becoming a signatory?

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Australian Aboriginal Art

Australia is the land of joy and enjoyment. But there is only a handful who know that Australia is also regarded as the country of art, culture and a rich heritage. And the forerunner in the Australian culture is the Australian aboriginal art form. It is, by far, the most distinguished and popular art forms in the country and is being applauded and appreciated not only in the continent, but also in other countries and continents in the world. In case you are new to Australia and Australian aboriginal artwork, there is no need for despair.

All that you ever wanted to now about aboriginal art work, aboriginal paintings or anything relating to these topics, this is the one stop destination for you. One click on the button and the storehouse of information about aboriginal art opens up in front of you. Get to know about the various art galleries where you can get aboriginal art and paintings and also know about the history of aboriginal art in the country. You can also read up on the authentic Australian aboriginal art, and how you can distinguish them from fake ones.

This is particularly useful, since now days there are innumerable reports of aboriginal art and paintings being smuggled out of the country. Hence, if you do not want to pay for a fake aboriginal painting, read on and you’ll know how to distinguish between the real and the fake painting.

Nowadays Australian aboriginal art and paintings are available everywhere. You can go as far as to India and get hold of Australian aboriginal art forms. You can also read up on aboriginal art and paintings on display at the California aboriginal art display. Learn about the various paintings on display and in case you want to buy them, there is information about that too.

There are numerous Aboriginal art tours available for travellers who wish to immerse themselves in Aboriginal art and culture. A good starting point to research these tours is The Northern Territory travel site which is available by clicking here. It is now incredibly easy to interact with aboriginal artists in their homelands, All you need to do is book a flight, organise a tour and some cheap travel insurance and you can be having cultural experience of a lifetime. Learn about Australian aboriginal lifestyle history, Australian bush aboriginal food and also the rankings of Australian aboriginal art aright here on this website.

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Support for the arts in Australia

Support for the arts in Australia is currently under threat from unprecedented government intervention. The Federal Government has proposed changes to the existing funding model which will shift the funds currently allocated to individual and independent artists and arts workers, early career and experimental arts, community and youth arts, and small-to-medium arts organisations.Organisations including the Australia Council for the Arts, an independent statutory body free from direct ministerial influence, have a long history of funding the arts via a peer-review system, ensuring a diverse and innovative arts sector. Peer-review is internationally recognised as best practice in determining excellence in the arts, as well as in many other sectors, including academic publishing, health care, accounting, law, engineering and aviation.

In addition to the establishment of the NPEA, Visions of Australia, Festivals of Australia programs and the Major Festivals Initiative will be removed from the Australia Council and administered directly by the Ministry of the Arts. These changes to funding are aimed at eroding federal support for the breadth of the arts sector.

The arts is a complex, rich and diverse sector which benefits all Australians, in ways both apparent and unseen:

  • 85% of Australians agree that the arts make for a richer and more meaningful life;
  • 38% of Australians creatively participate in the arts six or more times per year;
  • 109,000 students are undertaking creative arts qualifications at the tertiary level.

This is a critical moment for the arts in Australia. The Charter is as an advocacy tool. It is a public object, available to anyone engaging with arts policy development, be they artists, politicians or community leaders. It will be published online and collect the names of individuals, ensembles, groups and organisations that support the principles. In this way, its key functions are a) to unite the sector through the articulation of common ideals and b) influence and engage arts policy development on local, state and federal levels.

This amounts to $23 million annually, or 28% of the current allocation. These funds will be shifted away from the Australia Council for the Arts to a new funding body titled the National Program for Excellence in the Arts (NPEA), which will be administered by the Ministry of the Arts.

 

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